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Warning

This CLI reference is experimental. It is automatically generated, but does not match the jj help output exactly.

Command-Line Help for jj

This document contains the help content for the jj command-line program.

Command Overview:

jj

Jujutsu (An experimental VCS)

To get started, see the tutorial at https://github.com/martinvonz/jj/blob/main/docs/tutorial.md.

Usage: jj [OPTIONS] [COMMAND]

Subcommands:
  • abandon — Abandon a revision
  • backout — Apply the reverse of a revision on top of another revision
  • branch — Manage branches
  • cat — Print contents of a file in a revision
  • chmod — Sets or removes the executable bit for paths in the repo
  • commit — Update the description and create a new change on top
  • config — Manage config options
  • describe — Update the change description or other metadata
  • diff — Compare file contents between two revisions
  • diffedit — Touch up the content changes in a revision with a diff editor
  • duplicate — Create a new change with the same content as an existing one
  • edit — Sets the specified revision as the working-copy revision
  • files — List files in a revision
  • git — Commands for working with the underlying Git repo
  • init — Create a new repo in the given directory
  • interdiff — Compare the changes of two commits
  • log — Show revision history
  • move — Move changes from one revision into another
  • new — Create a new, empty change and (by default) edit it in the working copy
  • next — Move the working-copy commit to the child revision
  • obslog — Show how a change has evolved
  • operation — Commands for working with the operation log
  • parallelize — Parallelize revisions by making them siblings
  • prev — Change the working copy revision relative to the parent revision
  • rebase — Move revisions to different parent(s)
  • resolve — Resolve a conflicted file with an external merge tool
  • restore — Restore paths from another revision
  • root — Show the current workspace root directory
  • show — Show commit description and changes in a revision
  • sparse — Manage which paths from the working-copy commit are present in the working copy
  • split — Split a revision in two
  • squash — Move changes from a revision into another revision
  • status — Show high-level repo status
  • tag — Manage tags
  • util — Infrequently used commands such as for generating shell completions
  • undo — Undo an operation (shortcut for jj op undo)
  • unsquash — Move changes from a revision's parent into the revision
  • untrack — Stop tracking specified paths in the working copy
  • version — Display version information
  • workspace — Commands for working with workspaces
Options:
  • -R, --repository <REPOSITORY> — Path to repository to operate on
  • --ignore-working-copy — Don't snapshot the working copy, and don't update it

    Possible values: true, false

  • --at-operation <AT_OPERATION> — Operation to load the repo at

    Default value: @

  • --debug — Enable debug logging

    Possible values: true, false

  • --color <WHEN> — When to colorize output (always, never, auto)

  • --quiet — Silence non-primary command output

    Possible values: true, false

  • --no-pager — Disable the pager

    Possible values: true, false

  • --config-toml <TOML> — Additional configuration options (can be repeated)

jj abandon

Abandon a revision

Abandon a revision, rebasing descendants onto its parent(s). The behavior is similar to jj restore --changes-in; the difference is that jj abandon gives you a new change, while jj restore updates the existing change.

If a working-copy commit gets abandoned, it will be given a new, empty commit. This is true in general; it is not specific to this command.

Usage: jj abandon [OPTIONS] [REVISIONS]...

Arguments:
  • <REVISIONS> — The revision(s) to abandon

    Default value: @

Options:
  • -s, --summary — Do not print every abandoned commit on a separate line

    Possible values: true, false

  • -r — Ignored (but lets you pass -r for consistency with other commands)

jj backout

Apply the reverse of a revision on top of another revision

Usage: jj backout [OPTIONS]

Options:
  • -r, --revision <REVISION> — The revision to apply the reverse of

    Default value: @

  • -d, --destination <DESTINATION> — The revision to apply the reverse changes on top of

    Default value: @

jj branch

Manage branches.

For information about branches, see https://github.com/martinvonz/jj/blob/main/docs/branches.md.

Usage: jj branch <COMMAND>

Subcommands:
  • create — Create a new branch
  • delete — Delete an existing branch and propagate the deletion to remotes on the next push
  • forget — Forget everything about a branch, including its local and remote targets
  • list — List branches and their targets
  • rename — Rename old branch name to new branch name
  • set — Update an existing branch to point to a certain commit
  • track — Start tracking given remote branches
  • untrack — Stop tracking given remote branches

jj branch create

Create a new branch

Usage: jj branch create [OPTIONS] <NAMES>...

Arguments:
  • <NAMES> — The branches to create
Options:
  • -r, --revision <REVISION> — The branch's target revision

jj branch delete

Delete an existing branch and propagate the deletion to remotes on the next push

Usage: jj branch delete [NAMES]...

Arguments:
  • <NAMES> — The branches to delete
Options:
  • --glob <GLOB> — Deprecated. Please prefix the pattern with glob: instead

jj branch forget

Forget everything about a branch, including its local and remote targets.

A forgotten branch will not impact remotes on future pushes. It will be recreated on future pulls if it still exists in the remote.

Usage: jj branch forget [NAMES]...

Arguments:
  • <NAMES> — The branches to forget
Options:
  • --glob <GLOB> — Deprecated. Please prefix the pattern with glob: instead

jj branch list

List branches and their targets

By default, a tracking remote branch will be included only if its target is different from the local target. A non-tracking remote branch won't be listed. For a conflicted branch (both local and remote), old target revisions are preceded by a "-" and new target revisions are preceded by a "+".

For information about branches, see https://github.com/martinvonz/jj/blob/main/docs/branches.md.

Usage: jj branch list [OPTIONS] [NAMES]...

Arguments:
  • <NAMES> — Show branches whose local name matches
Options:
  • -a, --all-remotes — Show all tracking and non-tracking remote branches including the ones whose targets are synchronized with the local branches

    Possible values: true, false

  • -t, --tracked — Show remote tracked branches only. Omits local Git-tracking branches by default

    Possible values: true, false

  • -c, --conflicted — Show conflicted branches only

    Possible values: true, false

  • -r, --revisions <REVISIONS> — Show branches whose local targets are in the given revisions

jj branch rename

Rename old branch name to new branch name.

The new branch name points at the same commit as the old branch name.

Usage: jj branch rename <OLD> <NEW>

Arguments:
  • <OLD> — The old name of the branch
  • <NEW> — The new name of the branch

jj branch set

Update an existing branch to point to a certain commit

Usage: jj branch set [OPTIONS] <NAMES>...

Arguments:
  • <NAMES> — The branches to update
Options:
  • -r, --revision <REVISION> — The branch's target revision
  • -B, --allow-backwards — Allow moving the branch backwards or sideways

    Possible values: true, false

jj branch track

Start tracking given remote branches

A tracking remote branch will be imported as a local branch of the same name. Changes to it will propagate to the existing local branch on future pulls.

Usage: jj branch track <BRANCH@REMOTE>...

Arguments:
  • <BRANCH@REMOTE> — Remote branches to track

jj branch untrack

Stop tracking given remote branches

A non-tracking remote branch is just a pointer to the last-fetched remote branch. It won't be imported as a local branch on future pulls.

Usage: jj branch untrack <BRANCH@REMOTE>...

Arguments:
  • <BRANCH@REMOTE> — Remote branches to untrack

jj cat

Print contents of a file in a revision

Usage: jj cat [OPTIONS] <PATH>

Arguments:
  • <PATH> — The file to print
Options:
  • -r, --revision <REVISION> — The revision to get the file contents from

    Default value: @

jj chmod

Sets or removes the executable bit for paths in the repo

Unlike the POSIX chmod, jj chmod also works on Windows, on conflicted files, and on arbitrary revisions.

Usage: jj chmod [OPTIONS] <MODE> <PATHS>...

Arguments:
  • <MODE>

    Possible values:

    • n: Make a path non-executable (alias: normal)
    • x: Make a path executable (alias: executable)
  • <PATHS> — Paths to change the executable bit for

Options:
  • -r, --revision <REVISION> — The revision to update

    Default value: @

jj commit

Update the description and create a new change on top

Usage: jj commit [OPTIONS] [PATHS]...

Arguments:
  • <PATHS> — Put these paths in the first commit
Options:
  • -i, --interactive — Interactively choose which changes to include in the first commit

    Possible values: true, false

  • --tool <NAME> — Specify diff editor to be used (implies --interactive)

  • -m, --message <MESSAGE> — The change description to use (don't open editor)

jj config

Manage config options

Operates on jj configuration, which comes from the config file and environment variables.

For file locations, supported config options, and other details about jj config, see https://github.com/martinvonz/jj/blob/main/docs/config.md.

Usage: jj config <COMMAND>

Subcommands:
  • list — List variables set in config file, along with their values
  • get — Get the value of a given config option.
  • set — Update config file to set the given option to a given value
  • edit — Start an editor on a jj config file
  • path — Print the path to the config file

jj config list

List variables set in config file, along with their values

Usage: jj config list [OPTIONS] [NAME]

Arguments:
  • <NAME> — An optional name of a specific config option to look up
Options:
  • --include-defaults — Whether to explicitly include built-in default values in the list

    Possible values: true, false

  • --include-overridden — Allow printing overridden values

    Possible values: true, false

  • --user — Target the user-level config

    Possible values: true, false

  • --repo — Target the repo-level config

    Possible values: true, false

  • -T, --template <TEMPLATE> — Render each variable using the given template

jj config get

Get the value of a given config option.

Unlike jj config list, the result of jj config get is printed without extra formatting and therefore is usable in scripting. For example:

$ jj config list user.name user.name="Martin von Zweigbergk" $ jj config get user.name Martin von Zweigbergk

Usage: jj config get <NAME>

Arguments:
  • <NAME>

jj config set

Update config file to set the given option to a given value

Usage: jj config set <--user|--repo> <NAME> <VALUE>

Arguments:
  • <NAME>
  • <VALUE>
Options:
  • --user — Target the user-level config

    Possible values: true, false

  • --repo — Target the repo-level config

    Possible values: true, false

jj config edit

Start an editor on a jj config file.

Creates the file if it doesn't already exist regardless of what the editor does.

Usage: jj config edit <--user|--repo>

Options:
  • --user — Target the user-level config

    Possible values: true, false

  • --repo — Target the repo-level config

    Possible values: true, false

jj config path

Print the path to the config file

A config file at that path may or may not exist.

See jj config edit if you'd like to immediately edit the file.

Usage: jj config path <--user|--repo>

Options:
  • --user — Target the user-level config

    Possible values: true, false

  • --repo — Target the repo-level config

    Possible values: true, false

jj describe

Update the change description or other metadata

Starts an editor to let you edit the description of a change. The editor will be $EDITOR, or pico if that's not defined (Notepad on Windows).

Usage: jj describe [OPTIONS] [REVISION]

Arguments:
  • <REVISION> — The revision whose description to edit

    Default value: @

Options:
  • -r — Ignored (but lets you pass -r for consistency with other commands)

    Possible values: true, false

  • -m, --message <MESSAGE> — The change description to use (don't open editor)

  • --stdin — Read the change description from stdin

    Possible values: true, false

  • --no-edit — Don't open an editor

    Possible values: true, false

  • --reset-author — Reset the author to the configured user

    Possible values: true, false

jj diff

Compare file contents between two revisions

With the -r option, which is the default, shows the changes compared to the parent revision. If there are several parent revisions (i.e., the given revision is a merge), then they will be merged and the changes from the result to the given revision will be shown.

With the --from and/or --to options, shows the difference from/to the given revisions. If either is left out, it defaults to the working-copy commit. For example, jj diff --from main shows the changes from "main" (perhaps a branch name) to the working-copy commit.

Usage: jj diff [OPTIONS] [PATHS]...

Arguments:
  • <PATHS> — Restrict the diff to these paths
Options:
  • -r, --revision <REVISION> — Show changes in this revision, compared to its parent(s)
  • --from <FROM> — Show changes from this revision
  • --to <TO> — Show changes to this revision
  • -s, --summary — For each path, show only whether it was modified, added, or deleted

    Possible values: true, false

  • --stat — Show a histogram of the changes

    Possible values: true, false

  • --types — For each path, show only its type before and after

    Possible values: true, false

  • --git — Show a Git-format diff

    Possible values: true, false

  • --color-words — Show a word-level diff with changes indicated only by color

    Possible values: true, false

  • --tool <TOOL> — Generate diff by external command

  • --context <CONTEXT> — Number of lines of context to show

jj diffedit

Touch up the content changes in a revision with a diff editor

With the -r option, which is the default, starts a diff editor on the changes in the revision.

With the --from and/or --to options, starts a diff editor comparing the "from" revision to the "to" revision.

Edit the right side of the diff until it looks the way you want. Once you close the editor, the revision specified with -r or --to will be updated. Descendants will be rebased on top as usual, which may result in conflicts.

See jj restore if you want to move entire files from one revision to another. See jj squash -i or jj unsquash -i if you instead want to move changes into or out of the parent revision.

Usage: jj diffedit [OPTIONS]

Options:
  • -r, --revision <REVISION> — The revision to touch up. Defaults to @ if neither --to nor --from are specified
  • --from <FROM> — Show changes from this revision. Defaults to @ if --to is specified
  • --to <TO> — Edit changes in this revision. Defaults to @ if --from is specified
  • --tool <NAME> — Specify diff editor to be used

jj duplicate

Create a new change with the same content as an existing one

Usage: jj duplicate [REVISIONS]...

Arguments:
  • <REVISIONS> — The revision(s) to duplicate

    Default value: @

Options:
  • -r — Ignored (but lets you pass -r for consistency with other commands)

jj edit

Sets the specified revision as the working-copy revision

Note: it is generally recommended to instead use jj new and jj squash.

For more information, see https://martinvonz.github.io/jj/latest/FAQ#how-do-i-resume-working-on-an-existing-change

Usage: jj edit <REVISION>

Arguments:
  • <REVISION> — The commit to edit
Options:
  • -r — Ignored (but lets you pass -r for consistency with other commands)

    Possible values: true, false

jj files

List files in a revision

Usage: jj files [OPTIONS] [PATHS]...

Arguments:
  • <PATHS> — Only list files matching these prefixes (instead of all files)
Options:
  • -r, --revision <REVISION> — The revision to list files in

    Default value: @

jj git

Commands for working with the underlying Git repo

For a comparison with Git, including a table of commands, see https://github.com/martinvonz/jj/blob/main/docs/git-comparison.md.

Usage: jj git <COMMAND>

Subcommands:
  • remote — Manage Git remotes
  • init — Create a new Git backed repo
  • fetch — Fetch from a Git remote
  • clone — Create a new repo backed by a clone of a Git repo
  • push — Push to a Git remote
  • import — Update repo with changes made in the underlying Git repo
  • export — Update the underlying Git repo with changes made in the repo

jj git remote

Manage Git remotes

The Git repo will be a bare git repo stored inside the .jj/ directory.

Usage: jj git remote <COMMAND>

Subcommands:
  • add — Add a Git remote
  • remove — Remove a Git remote and forget its branches
  • rename — Rename a Git remote
  • list — List Git remotes

jj git remote add

Add a Git remote

Usage: jj git remote add <REMOTE> <URL>

Arguments:
  • <REMOTE> — The remote's name
  • <URL> — The remote's URL

jj git remote remove

Remove a Git remote and forget its branches

Usage: jj git remote remove <REMOTE>

Arguments:
  • <REMOTE> — The remote's name

jj git remote rename

Rename a Git remote

Usage: jj git remote rename <OLD> <NEW>

Arguments:
  • <OLD> — The name of an existing remote
  • <NEW> — The desired name for old

jj git remote list

List Git remotes

Usage: jj git remote list

jj git init

Create a new Git backed repo

Usage: jj git init [OPTIONS] [DESTINATION]

Arguments:
  • <DESTINATION> — The destination directory where the jj repo will be created. If the directory does not exist, it will be created. If no directory is diven, the current directory is used

    Default value: .

Options:
  • --colocate — Specifies that the jj repo should also be a valid git repo, allowing the use of both jj and git commands in the same directory

    Possible values: true, false

  • --git-repo <GIT_REPO> — Specifies a path to an existing git repository to be used as the backing git repo for the newly created jj repo

jj git fetch

Fetch from a Git remote

If a working-copy commit gets abandoned, it will be given a new, empty commit. This is true in general; it is not specific to this command.

Usage: jj git fetch [OPTIONS]

Options:
  • -b, --branch <BRANCH> — Fetch only some of the branches

    Default value: glob:*

  • --remote <remote> — The remote to fetch from (only named remotes are supported, can be repeated)

  • --all-remotes — Fetch from all remotes

    Possible values: true, false

jj git clone

Create a new repo backed by a clone of a Git repo

The Git repo will be a bare git repo stored inside the .jj/ directory.

Usage: jj git clone [OPTIONS] <SOURCE> [DESTINATION]

Arguments:
  • <SOURCE> — URL or path of the Git repo to clone
  • <DESTINATION> — The directory to write the Jujutsu repo to
Options:
  • --colocate — Whether or not to colocate the Jujutsu repo with the git repo

    Possible values: true, false

jj git push

Push to a Git remote

By default, pushes any branches pointing to remote_branches(remote=<remote>)..@. Use --branch to push specific branches. Use --all to push all branches. Use --change to generate branch names based on the change IDs of specific commits.

Usage: jj git push [OPTIONS]

Options:
  • --remote <REMOTE> — The remote to push to (only named remotes are supported)
  • -b, --branch <BRANCH> — Push only this branch, or branches matching a pattern (can be repeated)
  • --all — Push all branches (including deleted branches)

    Possible values: true, false

  • --tracked — Push all tracked branches (including deleted branches)

    Possible values: true, false

  • --deleted — Push all deleted branches

    Possible values: true, false

  • -r, --revisions <REVISIONS> — Push branches pointing to these commits (can be repeated)

  • -c, --change <CHANGE> — Push this commit by creating a branch based on its change ID (can be repeated)
  • --dry-run — Only display what will change on the remote

    Possible values: true, false

jj git import

Update repo with changes made in the underlying Git repo

If a working-copy commit gets abandoned, it will be given a new, empty commit. This is true in general; it is not specific to this command.

Usage: jj git import

jj git export

Update the underlying Git repo with changes made in the repo

Usage: jj git export

jj init

Create a new repo in the given directory

If the given directory does not exist, it will be created. If no directory is given, the current directory is used.

Usage: jj init [DESTINATION]

Arguments:
  • <DESTINATION> — The destination directory

    Default value: .

Options:
  • --git — DEPRECATED: Use jj git init Use the Git backend, creating a jj repo backed by a Git repo

    Possible values: true, false

  • --git-repo <GIT_REPO> — DEPRECATED: Use jj git init Path to a git repo the jj repo will be backed by

jj interdiff

Compare the changes of two commits

This excludes changes from other commits by temporarily rebasing --from onto --to's parents. If you wish to compare the same change across versions, consider jj obslog -p instead.

Usage: jj interdiff [OPTIONS] <--from <FROM>|--to <TO>> [PATHS]...

Arguments:
  • <PATHS> — Restrict the diff to these paths
Options:
  • --from <FROM> — Show changes from this revision
  • --to <TO> — Show changes to this revision
  • -s, --summary — For each path, show only whether it was modified, added, or deleted

    Possible values: true, false

  • --stat — Show a histogram of the changes

    Possible values: true, false

  • --types — For each path, show only its type before and after

    Possible values: true, false

  • --git — Show a Git-format diff

    Possible values: true, false

  • --color-words — Show a word-level diff with changes indicated only by color

    Possible values: true, false

  • --tool <TOOL> — Generate diff by external command

  • --context <CONTEXT> — Number of lines of context to show

jj log

Show revision history

Renders a graphical view of the project's history, ordered with children before parents. By default, the output only includes mutable revisions, along with some additional revisions for context.

Spans of revisions that are not included in the graph per --revisions are rendered as a synthetic node labeled "(elided revisions)".

Usage: jj log [OPTIONS] [PATHS]...

Arguments:
  • <PATHS> — Show revisions modifying the given paths
Options:
  • -r, --revisions <REVISIONS> — Which revisions to show. If no paths nor revisions are specified, this defaults to the revsets.log setting, or @ | ancestors(immutable_heads().., 2) | trunk() if it is not set
  • --reversed — Show revisions in the opposite order (older revisions first)

    Possible values: true, false

  • -l, --limit <LIMIT> — Limit number of revisions to show

  • --no-graph — Don't show the graph, show a flat list of revisions

    Possible values: true, false

  • -T, --template <TEMPLATE> — Render each revision using the given template

  • -p, --patch — Show patch

    Possible values: true, false

  • -s, --summary — For each path, show only whether it was modified, added, or deleted

    Possible values: true, false

  • --stat — Show a histogram of the changes

    Possible values: true, false

  • --types — For each path, show only its type before and after

    Possible values: true, false

  • --git — Show a Git-format diff

    Possible values: true, false

  • --color-words — Show a word-level diff with changes indicated only by color

    Possible values: true, false

  • --tool <TOOL> — Generate diff by external command

  • --context <CONTEXT> — Number of lines of context to show

jj move

Move changes from one revision into another

Use --interactive to move only part of the source revision into the destination. The selected changes (or all the changes in the source revision if not using --interactive) will be moved into the destination. The changes will be removed from the source. If that means that the source is now empty compared to its parent, it will be abandoned. Without --interactive, the source change will always be empty.

If the source became empty and both the source and destination had a non-empty description, you will be asked for the combined description. If either was empty, then the other one will be used.

If a working-copy commit gets abandoned, it will be given a new, empty commit. This is true in general; it is not specific to this command.

Usage: jj move [OPTIONS] <--from <FROM>|--to <TO>> [PATHS]...

Arguments:
  • <PATHS> — Move only changes to these paths (instead of all paths)
Options:
  • -f, --from <FROM> — Move part of this change into the destination
  • -t, --to <TO> — Move part of the source into this change
  • -i, --interactive — Interactively choose which parts to move

    Possible values: true, false

  • --tool <NAME> — Specify diff editor to be used (implies --interactive)

jj new

Create a new, empty change and (by default) edit it in the working copy

By default, jj will edit the new change, making the working copy represent the new commit. This can be avoided with --no-edit.

Note that you can create a merge commit by specifying multiple revisions as argument. For example, jj new main @ will create a new commit with the main branch and the working copy as parents.

For more information, see https://github.com/martinvonz/jj/blob/main/docs/working-copy.md.

Usage: jj new [OPTIONS] [REVISIONS]...

Arguments:
  • <REVISIONS> — Parent(s) of the new change

    Default value: @

Options:
  • -r — Ignored (but lets you pass -r for consistency with other commands)
  • -m, --message <MESSAGE> — The change description to use
  • -L, --allow-large-revsets — Deprecated. Please prefix the revset with all: instead

    Possible values: true, false

  • --no-edit — Do not edit the newly created change

    Possible values: true, false

  • --edit — No-op flag to pair with --no-edit

    Possible values: true, false

  • -A, --insert-after — Insert the new change between the target commit(s) and their children

    Possible values: true, false

  • -B, --insert-before — Insert the new change between the target commit(s) and their parents

    Possible values: true, false

jj next

Move the working-copy commit to the child revision

The command creates a new empty working copy revision that is the child of a descendant offset revisions ahead of the parent of the current working copy.

For example, when the offset is 1:

D        D @
|        |/
C @  =>  C
|/       |
B        B

If --edit is passed, the working copy revision is changed to the child of the current working copy revision.

D        D
|        |
C        C
|        |
B   =>   @
|        |
@        A
If your working-copy commit already has visible children, then --edit is implied.

Usage: jj next [OPTIONS] [OFFSET]

Arguments:
  • <OFFSET> — How many revisions to move forward. Advances to the next child by default

    Default value: 1

Options:
  • --edit — Instead of creating a new working-copy commit on top of the target commit (like jj new), edit the target commit directly (like jj edit)

    Possible values: true, false

jj obslog

Show how a change has evolved

Show how a change has evolved as it's been updated, rebased, etc.

Usage: jj obslog [OPTIONS]

Options:
  • -r, --revision <REVISION>

    Default value: @

  • -l, --limit <LIMIT> — Limit number of revisions to show

  • --no-graph — Don't show the graph, show a flat list of revisions

    Possible values: true, false

  • -T, --template <TEMPLATE> — Render each revision using the given template

  • -p, --patch — Show patch compared to the previous version of this change

    Possible values: true, false

  • -s, --summary — For each path, show only whether it was modified, added, or deleted

    Possible values: true, false

  • --stat — Show a histogram of the changes

    Possible values: true, false

  • --types — For each path, show only its type before and after

    Possible values: true, false

  • --git — Show a Git-format diff

    Possible values: true, false

  • --color-words — Show a word-level diff with changes indicated only by color

    Possible values: true, false

  • --tool <TOOL> — Generate diff by external command

  • --context <CONTEXT> — Number of lines of context to show

jj operation

Commands for working with the operation log

For information about the operation log, see https://github.com/martinvonz/jj/blob/main/docs/operation-log.md.

Usage: jj operation <COMMAND>

Subcommands:
  • abandon — Abandon operation history
  • log — Show the operation log
  • undo — Create a new operation that undoes an earlier operation
  • restore — Create a new operation that restores the repo to an earlier state

jj operation abandon

Abandon operation history

To discard old operation history, use jj op abandon ..<operation ID>. It will abandon the specified operation and all its ancestors. The descendants will be reparented onto the root operation.

To discard recent operations, use jj op restore <operation ID> followed by jj op abandon <operation ID>..@-.

The abandoned operations, commits, and other unreachable objects can later be garbage collected by using jj util gc command.

Usage: jj operation abandon <OPERATION>

Arguments:
  • <OPERATION> — The operation or operation range to abandon

jj operation log

Show the operation log

Usage: jj operation log [OPTIONS]

Options:
  • -l, --limit <LIMIT> — Limit number of operations to show
  • --no-graph — Don't show the graph, show a flat list of operations

    Possible values: true, false

  • -T, --template <TEMPLATE> — Render each operation using the given template

jj operation undo

Create a new operation that undoes an earlier operation

This undoes an individual operation by applying the inverse of the operation.

Usage: jj operation undo [OPTIONS] [OPERATION]

Arguments:
  • <OPERATION> — The operation to undo

    Default value: @

Options:
  • --what <WHAT> — What portions of the local state to restore (can be repeated)

    Default values: repo, remote-tracking

    Possible values:

    • repo: The jj repo state and local branches
    • remote-tracking: The remote-tracking branches. Do not restore these if you'd like to push after the undo

jj operation restore

Create a new operation that restores the repo to an earlier state

This restores the repo to the state at the specified operation, effectively undoing all later operations. It does so by creating a new operation.

Usage: jj operation restore [OPTIONS] <OPERATION>

Arguments:
  • <OPERATION> — The operation to restore to
Options:
  • --what <WHAT> — What portions of the local state to restore (can be repeated)

    Default values: repo, remote-tracking

    Possible values:

    • repo: The jj repo state and local branches
    • remote-tracking: The remote-tracking branches. Do not restore these if you'd like to push after the undo

jj parallelize

Parallelize revisions by making them siblings

Running jj parallelize 1::2 will transform the history like this:

3
|             3
2            / \
|    ->     1   2
1            \ /
|             0
0

Each of the target revisions is rebased onto the parents of the root(s) of the target revset (not to be confused with the repo root). The children of the head(s) of the target revset are rebased onto the target revisions.

The target revset is the union of the revisions arguments and must satisfy several conditions, otherwise the command will fail.

  1. The heads of the target revset must have either the same children as the other heads or none.
  2. The roots of the target revset have the same parents.
  3. The parents of all target revisions except the roots must also be parallelized. This means that the target revisions must be connected.

Usage: jj parallelize [REVISIONS]...

Arguments:
  • <REVISIONS> — Revisions to parallelize

jj prev

Change the working copy revision relative to the parent revision

The command creates a new empty working copy revision that is the child of an ancestor offset revisions behind the parent of the current working copy.

For example, when the offset is 1:

D @      D
|/       |
A   =>   A @
|        |/
B        B

If --edit is passed, the working copy revision is changed to the parent of the current working copy revision.

D @      D
|/       |
C   =>   @
|        |
B        B
|        |
A        A
If the working copy revision already has visible children, then --edit is implied.

Usage: jj prev [OPTIONS] [OFFSET]

Arguments:
  • <OFFSET> — How many revisions to move backward. Moves to the parent by default

    Default value: 1

Options:
  • --edit — Edit the parent directly, instead of moving the working-copy commit

    Possible values: true, false

jj rebase

Move revisions to different parent(s)

There are three different ways of specifying which revisions to rebase: -b to rebase a whole branch, -s to rebase a revision and its descendants, and -r to rebase a single commit. If none of them is specified, it defaults to -b @.

With -s, the command rebases the specified revision and its descendants onto the destination. For example, jj rebase -s M -d O would transform your history like this (letters followed by an apostrophe are post-rebase versions):

O           N'
|           |
| N         M'
| |         |
| M         O
| |    =>   |
| | L       | L
| |/        | |
| K         | K
|/          |/
J           J

With -b, the command rebases the whole "branch" containing the specified revision. A "branch" is the set of commits that includes:

  • the specified revision and ancestors that are not also ancestors of the destination
  • all descendants of those commits

In other words, jj rebase -b X -d Y rebases commits in the revset (Y..X):: (which is equivalent to jj rebase -s 'roots(Y..X)' -d Y for a single root). For example, either jj rebase -b L -d O or jj rebase -b M -d O would transform your history like this (because L and M are on the same "branch", relative to the destination):

O           N'
|           |
| N         M'
| |         |
| M         | L'
| |    =>   |/
| | L       K'
| |/        |
| K         O
|/          |
J           J

With -r, the command rebases only the specified revision onto the destination. Any "hole" left behind will be filled by rebasing descendants onto the specified revision's parent(s). For example, jj rebase -r K -d M would transform your history like this:

M          K'
|          |
| L        M
| |   =>   |
| K        | L'
|/         |/
J          J

Note that you can create a merge commit by repeating the -d argument. For example, if you realize that commit L actually depends on commit M in order to work (in addition to its current parent K), you can run jj rebase -s L -d K -d M:

M          L'
|          |\
| L        M |
| |   =>   | |
| K        | K
|/         |/
J          J

If a working-copy commit gets abandoned, it will be given a new, empty commit. This is true in general; it is not specific to this command.

Usage: jj rebase [OPTIONS] --destination <DESTINATION>

Options:
  • -b, --branch <BRANCH> — Rebase the whole branch relative to destination's ancestors (can be repeated)
  • -s, --source <SOURCE> — Rebase specified revision(s) together with their trees of descendants (can be repeated)
  • -r, --revision <REVISION> — Rebase only this revision, rebasing descendants onto this revision's parent(s)
  • -d, --destination <DESTINATION> — The revision(s) to rebase onto (can be repeated to create a merge commit)
  • --skip-empty — If true, when rebasing would produce an empty commit, the commit is abandoned. It will not be abandoned if it was already empty before the rebase. Will never skip merge commits with multiple non-empty parents

    Possible values: true, false

  • -L, --allow-large-revsets — Deprecated. Please prefix the revset with all: instead

    Possible values: true, false

jj resolve

Resolve a conflicted file with an external merge tool

Only conflicts that can be resolved with a 3-way merge are supported. See docs for merge tool configuration instructions.

Note that conflicts can also be resolved without using this command. You may edit the conflict markers in the conflicted file directly with a text editor.

Usage: jj resolve [OPTIONS] [PATHS]...

Arguments:
  • <PATHS> — Restrict to these paths when searching for a conflict to resolve. We will attempt to resolve the first conflict we can find. You can use the --list argument to find paths to use here
Options:
  • -r, --revision <REVISION>

    Default value: @

  • -l, --list — Instead of resolving one conflict, list all the conflicts

    Possible values: true, false

  • --tool <NAME> — Specify 3-way merge tool to be used

jj restore

Restore paths from another revision

That means that the paths get the same content in the destination (--to) as they had in the source (--from). This is typically used for undoing changes to some paths in the working copy (jj restore <paths>).

If only one of --from or --to is specified, the other one defaults to the working copy.

When neither --from nor --to is specified, the command restores into the working copy from its parent(s). jj restore without arguments is similar to jj abandon, except that it leaves an empty revision with its description and other metadata preserved.

See jj diffedit if you'd like to restore portions of files rather than entire files.

Usage: jj restore [OPTIONS] [PATHS]...

Arguments:
  • <PATHS> — Restore only these paths (instead of all paths)
Options:
  • --from <FROM> — Revision to restore from (source)
  • --to <TO> — Revision to restore into (destination)
  • -c, --changes-in <REVISION> — Undo the changes in a revision as compared to the merge of its parents
  • -r, --revision <REVISION> — Prints an error. DO NOT USE

jj root

Show the current workspace root directory

Usage: jj root

jj show

Show commit description and changes in a revision

Usage: jj show [OPTIONS] [REVISION]

Arguments:
  • <REVISION> — Show changes in this revision, compared to its parent(s)

    Default value: @

Options:
  • -r — Ignored (but lets you pass -r for consistency with other commands)

    Possible values: true, false

  • -T, --template <TEMPLATE> — Render a revision using the given template

  • -s, --summary — For each path, show only whether it was modified, added, or deleted

    Possible values: true, false

  • --stat — Show a histogram of the changes

    Possible values: true, false

  • --types — For each path, show only its type before and after

    Possible values: true, false

  • --git — Show a Git-format diff

    Possible values: true, false

  • --color-words — Show a word-level diff with changes indicated only by color

    Possible values: true, false

  • --tool <TOOL> — Generate diff by external command

  • --context <CONTEXT> — Number of lines of context to show

jj sparse

Manage which paths from the working-copy commit are present in the working copy

Usage: jj sparse <COMMAND>

Subcommands:
  • list — List the patterns that are currently present in the working copy
  • set — Update the patterns that are present in the working copy
  • reset — Reset the patterns to include all files in the working copy
  • edit — Start an editor to update the patterns that are present in the working copy

jj sparse list

List the patterns that are currently present in the working copy

By default, a newly cloned or initialized repo will have have a pattern matching all files from the repo root. That pattern is rendered as . (a single period).

Usage: jj sparse list

jj sparse set

Update the patterns that are present in the working copy

For example, if all you need is the README.md and the lib/ directory, use jj sparse set --clear --add README.md --add lib. If you no longer need the lib directory, use jj sparse set --remove lib.

Usage: jj sparse set [OPTIONS]

Options:
  • --add <ADD> — Patterns to add to the working copy
  • --remove <REMOVE> — Patterns to remove from the working copy
  • --clear — Include no files in the working copy (combine with --add)

    Possible values: true, false

jj sparse reset

Reset the patterns to include all files in the working copy

Usage: jj sparse reset

jj sparse edit

Start an editor to update the patterns that are present in the working copy

Usage: jj sparse edit

jj split

Split a revision in two

Starts a diff editor on the changes in the revision. Edit the right side of the diff until it has the content you want in the first revision. Once you close the editor, your edited content will replace the previous revision. The remaining changes will be put in a new revision on top.

If the change you split had a description, you will be asked to enter a change description for each commit. If the change did not have a description, the second part will not get a description, and you will be asked for a description only for the first part.

Usage: jj split [OPTIONS] [PATHS]...

Arguments:
  • <PATHS> — Put these paths in the first commit
Options:
  • -i, --interactive — Interactively choose which parts to split. This is the default if no paths are provided

    Possible values: true, false

  • --tool <NAME> — Specify diff editor to be used (implies --interactive)

  • -r, --revision <REVISION> — The revision to split

    Default value: @

  • -s, --siblings — Split the revision into two siblings instead of a parent and child

    Possible values: true, false

jj squash

Move changes from a revision into another revision

With the -r option, moves the changes from the specified revision to the parent revision. Fails if there are several parent revisions (i.e., the given revision is a merge).

With the --from and/or --into options, moves changes from/to the given revisions. If either is left out, it defaults to the working-copy commit. For example, jj squash --into @-- moves changes from the working-copy commit to the grandparent.

If, after moving changes out, the source revision is empty compared to its parent(s), it will be abandoned. Without --interactive, the source revision will always be empty.

If the source became empty and both the source and destination had a non-empty description, you will be asked for the combined description. If either was empty, then the other one will be used.

If a working-copy commit gets abandoned, it will be given a new, empty commit. This is true in general; it is not specific to this command.

Usage: jj squash [OPTIONS] [PATHS]...

Arguments:
  • <PATHS> — Move only changes to these paths (instead of all paths)
Options:
  • -r, --revision <REVISION> — Revision to squash into its parent (default: @)
  • --from <FROM> — Revision(s) to squash from (default: @)
  • --into <INTO> — Revision to squash into (default: @)
  • -m, --message <MESSAGE> — The description to use for squashed revision (don't open editor)
  • -i, --interactive — Interactively choose which parts to squash

    Possible values: true, false

  • --tool <NAME> — Specify diff editor to be used (implies --interactive)

jj status

Show high-level repo status

This includes:

  • The working copy commit and its (first) parent, and a summary of the changes between them

  • Conflicted branches (see https://github.com/martinvonz/jj/blob/main/docs/branches.md)

Usage: jj status [PATHS]...

Arguments:
  • <PATHS> — Restrict the status display to these paths

jj tag

Manage tags

Usage: jj tag <COMMAND>

Subcommands:
  • list — List tags

jj tag list

List tags

Usage: jj tag list [NAMES]...

Arguments:
  • <NAMES> — Show tags whose local name matches

jj util

Infrequently used commands such as for generating shell completions

Usage: jj util <COMMAND>

Subcommands:
  • completion — Print a command-line-completion script
  • gc — Run backend-dependent garbage collection
  • mangen — Print a ROFF (manpage)
  • markdown-help — Print the CLI help for all subcommands in Markdown
  • config-schema — Print the JSON schema for the jj TOML config format

jj util completion

Print a command-line-completion script

Apply it by running one of these:

  • bash: source <(jj util completion bash)
  • fish: jj util completion fish | source
  • nushell:
    jj util completion nushell | save "completions-jj.nu"
    use "completions-jj.nu" *  # Or `source "completions-jj.nu"`
    
  • zsh:
    autoload -U compinit
    compinit
    source <(jj util completion zsh)
    

Usage: jj util completion [SHELL]

Arguments:
  • <SHELL>

    Possible values: bash, elvish, fish, nushell, power-shell, zsh

Options:
  • --bash — Deprecated. Use the SHELL positional argument instead

    Possible values: true, false

  • --fish — Deprecated. Use the SHELL positional argument instead

    Possible values: true, false

  • --zsh — Deprecated. Use the SHELL positional argument instead

    Possible values: true, false

jj util gc

Run backend-dependent garbage collection

Usage: jj util gc [OPTIONS]

Options:
  • --expire <EXPIRE> — Time threshold

jj util mangen

Print a ROFF (manpage)

Usage: jj util mangen

jj util markdown-help

Print the CLI help for all subcommands in Markdown

Usage: jj util markdown-help

jj util config-schema

Print the JSON schema for the jj TOML config format

Usage: jj util config-schema

jj undo

Undo an operation (shortcut for jj op undo)

Usage: jj undo [OPTIONS] [OPERATION]

Arguments:
  • <OPERATION> — The operation to undo

    Default value: @

Options:
  • --what <WHAT> — What portions of the local state to restore (can be repeated)

    Default values: repo, remote-tracking

    Possible values:

    • repo: The jj repo state and local branches
    • remote-tracking: The remote-tracking branches. Do not restore these if you'd like to push after the undo

jj unsquash

Move changes from a revision's parent into the revision

After moving the changes out of the parent, the child revision will have the same content state as before. If moving the change out of the parent change made it empty compared to its parent, it will be abandoned. Without --interactive, the parent change will always become empty.

If the source became empty and both the source and destination had a non-empty description, you will be asked for the combined description. If either was empty, then the other one will be used.

If a working-copy commit gets abandoned, it will be given a new, empty commit. This is true in general; it is not specific to this command.

Usage: jj unsquash [OPTIONS]

Options:
  • -r, --revision <REVISION>

    Default value: @

  • -i, --interactive — Interactively choose which parts to unsquash

    Possible values: true, false

  • --tool <NAME> — Specify diff editor to be used (implies --interactive)

jj untrack

Stop tracking specified paths in the working copy

Usage: jj untrack <PATHS>...

Arguments:
  • <PATHS> — Paths to untrack. They must already be ignored

jj version

Display version information

Usage: jj version

jj workspace

Commands for working with workspaces

Workspaces let you add additional working copies attached to the same repo. A common use case is so you can run a slow build or test in one workspace while you're continuing to write code in another workspace.

Each workspace has its own working-copy commit. When you have more than one workspace attached to a repo, they are indicated by @<workspace name> in jj log.

Each workspace also has own sparse patterns.

Usage: jj workspace <COMMAND>

Subcommands:
  • add — Add a workspace
  • forget — Stop tracking a workspace's working-copy commit in the repo
  • list — List workspaces
  • root — Show the current workspace root directory
  • update-stale — Update a workspace that has become stale

jj workspace add

Add a workspace

Sparse patterns will be copied over from the current workspace.

Usage: jj workspace add [OPTIONS] <DESTINATION>

Arguments:
  • <DESTINATION> — Where to create the new workspace
Options:
  • --name <NAME> — A name for the workspace
  • -r, --revision <REVISION> — A list of parent revisions for the working-copy commit of the newly created workspace. You may specify nothing, or any number of parents

jj workspace forget

Stop tracking a workspace's working-copy commit in the repo

The workspace will not be touched on disk. It can be deleted from disk before or after running this command.

Usage: jj workspace forget [WORKSPACES]...

Arguments:
  • <WORKSPACES> — Names of the workspaces to forget. By default, forgets only the current workspace

jj workspace list

List workspaces

Usage: jj workspace list

jj workspace root

Show the current workspace root directory

Usage: jj workspace root

jj workspace update-stale

Update a workspace that has become stale

For information about stale working copies, see https://github.com/martinvonz/jj/blob/main/docs/working-copy.md.

Usage: jj workspace update-stale


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